1839 Tithe Map [the Malthouse and Nos 12 & 14 are ringed in red]. The kitchen block is discernible as a separate structure and the large Pickwick Brewery building complex is located to the south east of 12 Pickwick. The structure to the north of the kitchen block was demolished in 1953.
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‘Old’ Pickwickians

Our Editor, John Maloney’s first article in the  July Spotlight, was of great interest to me, as he referred not only to his own property – 12 Pickwick, but the adjoining house No. 14.

This was the home of my grandparents Bill and Rose Say, for about 40 years, it may have been be longer, but I cannot be sure.

Through family research it appears that the Say family, came to Wiltshire via Somerset sometime between 1819 and 1842, when g.g. grandfather Charles married a young lady from Melksham. The men were farmers, agricultural labourers, and miners in Somerset, so one wonders if he looked to the local stone mining industry when first they settled in Melksham and then Box.

2nd son James moved to Corsham in about 1874, and the family lived in Priory Road, with eventually a family of 6 sons and 6 daughters. By 1900 the family was growing up, and Alfred William (Bill) married Rose North in 1900. He was employed as a ‘quarry foreman’ at the Copenacre site. At first they are registered by census as living at Priory Road, but not with the parents.  But by 1911 they were living at ‘4 New Buildings, Bradford Road’.   I would presume this address refers to the terraced cottages on the LH side toward Rudloe, and now known only as Bradford Road. However, in 1941 they were living at 14 Pickwick , when and why did they move? Were they renting from the Brewery, or later from the Pickwick Estate and Frederick Goldney? Was it to house an expanding family, they had 6 children by 1912?

One of their sons, bought No 14. for his parents in 1948 – at the Goldney families  ‘Sale of the Pickwick Estate’, and they remained in the property till about 1960.

I spent many happy times as a child playing with my cousin ‘out in the Brewery’!

Ah, happy days.

Pat Whalley

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